Quick fix for poor screen reader support of title attribute

As someone who remembers when ARIA was just an idea, I’ve spent a fair amount of time adding title="something descriptive" to many of the links, images, and possibly other elements on web pages I’ve authored and edited. But as developers began relying on authentic users of assistive technology to test their work, and those with differing abilities brought their knowledge and experience into the discussion and onto the Web, we learned we were wrong. Some of us knew that early on, or part of it anyway, and in the paralysis that may sometimes grip those unsure what to do, I stopped using title for anchor tags (i.e. links; <a>) altogether.

ARIA’s all grown up now

ARIA grew up and became the specification. The bulk of screen readers put their support there, and aria-label="making this meaningful" has supplanted the title attribute, freeing it to be what it is.

There’s enough explanation about this on the Internet already, so I’m going to keep this one very short. There are a lot of links in my pages that are in various states that reflected my limited understanding at the time, and maybe in yours too—live and learn! As I’m mostly working with WordPress sites these days, and WordPress has built-in jQuery, I’m sharing this snippet of code that takes text from existing “titles” and places it in an aria-label, or takes the linked text displayed to the visitor and makes it a bit more friendly and conversational than the typical screen reader default: “Link text. Link”

Most of my WordPress sites have a js folder in the theme I’ve chosen’s main folder at …wp-content/themes/theme-name/js, and in it a file called functions.js. Below is a standalone jQuery closure that should work in any site that has jQuery installed. In practice I took the indented part, between the first and last lines, and pasted it below the existing scripts in the existing closure. In Drupal you might put it in …/sites/all/themes/theme-name/js (and load it with a preprocess.inc). If you’re not using a CMS you probably need to wrap it in <script></script> tags, and make sure you place it below the prerequisite jQuery include.

For the blog you’re reading now, which didn’t already have a functions.js file in place, rather than stuff it into another I placed the following line below wp_head(); in header.php, found in the WordPress root folder.

wp_enqueue_script( 'my-custom-functions', get_template_directory_uri() .'/js/functions.js' );

This quick fix should probably be considered a temporary one, but it sure makes my pages sound better with ChromeVox, so I’ll carry on and wait for experts like Geoff Collis and others to tell me what to do next.

(function($) {
  // If there's a title attribute, make sure it's copied to aria-label (for screenreaders)
  // If there's no title, elaborate on the linked text.
      var
        links = $('a')
      ;
      links.each(function(i){
      	if (this.title){
      		$(this).attr({'aria-label':this.title});
      	} else {
      		this.title="Go to " + $(this).text() + ".";
      		$(this).attr({'aria-label':this.title});
      	}
      });


})(jQuery);


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